Archives for posts with tag: multi disciplinary

Photo: courtesy of Tomahawk Studios 

Having just recently returned from tour in Jakarta, Van She percussionist Tomek Archer is not only a musician but the award-winning creative director of Tomahawk Studios furniture design and practices as an architect for a commercial firm in Sydney. His signature furniture piece, The campfire table is now held in the permanent collection of the Art Gallery of Western Australia. Tomek talks to arts interview about working with others and stress.

 Interview by Lydia Bradshaw

What are the broad stress factors of being a musician on tour?

Well you put a lot of stress on your body, because you’re mostly sitting around waiting, really inactive. Then you have about an hour of really intense activity, and then that’s it. You probably drink too much, and are usually dehydrated, so it’s mainly a stress on your body. It’s more of a physical stress than a mental stress.

I suppose the only time things really would ever get stressful for musicians, or for anyone, is when you have difficulty focusing upon the present and what is straight in front of you. Stress is when you are worried about something that might happen or something you cannot help. So it’s pretty important when doing anything to be able to put all that aside.

How does working across different mediums affect your perception of stress and how would you describe its affect upon wellbeing?

I think of music and design more as being complimentary – as two halves of a whole. But it means that I am always working- one seems to always be the downtime from the other.  All of my breaks from design are on tour and all the down time from touring is filled with design. So it’s pretty rare to have a holiday that isn’t at all design or music related.

It’s common for people working in creative industries to have many projects all going on at once. How important is flexibility when you are working on a number of projects?

Flexibility is the ability to adapt, and sometimes it means that everyone around you who you work with is required to be a bit flexible as well. It can definitely put a strain on other people you’re working with. I have found that everyone I work with has been pretty flexible, other wise I wouldn’t have been able to do what I’ve done.

What do you do to relax?

I’d like to say travelling, but every time I go travelling I’m working so it doesn’t really count. I haven’t been on a long holiday in a while. I’m not that good at sitting still for a very long time. I think it’s different for people who work primarily for money, but I guess I’ve designed a life for myself where I will probably never stop working. I’ll probably never retire. I like watching films. I like going to the snow. But, whatever I’m doing I always keep my eyes open as well. My brain doesn’t turn off. I should probably start meditating. I’m totally in control all the time- like Patrick Bateman.

http://www.tomahawkstudios.com/

http://www.vanshe.com/

Tara Morelos is the Director of dLux Media Arts (dLux), one of Australia’s longest running screen and media arts organisations. dLux works with a range of artists, writers & curators, to present projects from the screening of single channel video art to multi-channel installations and interactive and locative media for mobile devices. Morelos worked as a graphic designer in the corporate sector before going on to study Sculpture, Performance and Installation at Sydney College of the Arts. Morelos is also the Director of Sculpture in the Vineyards.

Interview by Alex Bellemore

How important is the role of learning at dLux?

dLux is organisationally familiar with change, shape shifting to meet the needs of its community and gaining enormous social capital in the process. As staff we are constantly learning and meeting the challenges of working, firstly within the not for profit arts sector and secondly within an organisation tasked with being cutting edge. It’s very hands on and particularly with our regional partners we had taken on the informal role as educators within an emerging field of exhibition practice as galleries began wanting to show more video and interactive works within their programs.

dLux has a strong emphasis on touring and rural education initiatives, what learning strategies do you put in place when approaching communities with limited exposure to digital media practice or broadly the arts sector?

By demystifying simple technologies for galleries and regional audiences through delivering a well supported touring program of media-orientated works we began to better understand the needs of the sector.

By using digital storytelling and technology we found a way to strongly influence the way people see themselves and break down existing barriers to learning. As a specialist media arts organisation, dLux is able to utilise an array of digital technologies to capture the imagination of new audiences putting the web, open source software and other information and communication technologies (ICT) to cost effective use in regional communities. In 2011 dLux became a social enterprise of the iStreet Lab phenomenon.  Working with mervin Jarman, Jamaican community art activist and human computer interface expert we built the iStreet dLux Lab. As part of the dStudio program, the iStreet dLux Lab extends its reach into the exploration of creative art practice for artists and communities alike.

Do you think that screen/ digital media art is represented well in the arts sector, in terms of awareness and funding?

In my experience, there is a general reluctance in the world of contemporary art to engage meaningfully with digital and new media art practice, social networking, or gaming. Yet these are some of the largest and fastest-growing areas of culture today. There is a tendency to largely dismiss media arts without fully appreciating the theoretical richness or conceptual parallels it has with more established art forms. Since the dismantling of New Media Arts Board in 2004, the Inter Arts Office of the Australia Council is doing its best on a very small budget to encourage the development of new media and multi-platform culture. It can be a problematic area for these kinds of agencies due to its potential to straddle the art and industry divide. dLux has often fallen through these cracks. We have now begun to look more consistently outside the arts funding pool, though gratefully acknowledge the continued core support of our partners Arts NSW.

dLux was established in the 1980’s under another name The Super 8 – Film Group, how has the organisation changed from then to now?

dLux Media Arts remains a small and resilient organisation with a clearly defined role within the Australian cultural sector known for supporting and developing risky projects in an experimental environment. We retain a direct link to our maverick experimental screen origins as the Sydney Super-8 Film Group, whose films constituted a construction of a particular social and political memory of a specific historical time period, 1980-1990.  We have an archive of every work shown since the 1980s through the 90s and up to recent projects including digital versions of films, lists of all the screenings and works, all the writings and artists details from the last 30 years.

What are some upcoming projects and goals for dLux?

We recently received an Unlocking Australia’s Potential science communication grant for dLab, our regional access and skills development program. Over three years and four primary regional locations, we will be working predominantly with young women from culturally and linguistically diverse and Aboriginal backgrounds to engage in research and science activities. Using local culturally relevant resources and an informal creative methodology, participants will create their own mobile multi media dLab for community use. We have ambitious plans to further boost and diversify our funding, increase our audiences, consolidate our brand by offering new services on the commercial market. By maximising the talents of our artist communities we plan to move thoughtfully into servicing a growing demand within the commercial sector for authentic cultural products in app development and exhibition management. The future is bright!

www.dlux.org.au

Photo: courtesy of Tomahawk Studios 

Having just recently returned from tour in Jakarta, Van She percussionist Tomek Archer is not only a musician but the award-winning creative director of Tomahawk Studios furniture design and practices as an architect for a commercial firm in Sydney. His signature furniture piece, The campfire table is now held in the permanent collection of the Art Gallery of Western Australia. Tomek talks to arts interview about working with others and stress.

 Interview by Lydia Bradshaw

What are the broad stress factors of being a musician on tour?

Well you put a lot of stress on your body, because you’re mostly sitting around waiting, really inactive. Then you have about an hour of really intense activity, and then that’s it. You probably drink too much, and are usually dehydrated, so it’s mainly a stress on your body. It’s more of a physical stress than a mental stress.

I suppose the only time things really would ever get stressful for musicians, or for anyone, is when you have difficulty focusing upon the present and what is straight in front of you. Stress is when you are worried about something that might happen or something you cannot help. So it’s pretty important when doing anything to be able to put all that aside.

How does working across different mediums affect your perception of stress and how would you describe its affect upon wellbeing?

I think of music and design more as being complimentary – as two halves of a whole. But it means that I am always working- one seems to always be the downtime from the other.  All of my breaks from design are on tour and all the down time from touring is filled with design. So it’s pretty rare to have a holiday that isn’t at all design or music related.

It’s common for people working in creative industries to have many projects all going on at once. How important is flexibility when you are working on a number of projects?

Flexibility is the ability to adapt, and sometimes it means that everyone around you who you work with is required to be a bit flexible as well. It can definitely put a strain on other people you’re working with. I have found that everyone I work with has been pretty flexible, other wise I wouldn’t have been able to do what I’ve done.

What do you do to relax?

I’d like to say travelling, but every time I go travelling I’m working so it doesn’t really count. I haven’t been on a long holiday in a while. I’m not that good at sitting still for a very long time. I think it’s different for people who work primarily for money, but I guess I’ve designed a life for myself where I will probably never stop working. I’ll probably never retire. I like watching films. I like going to the snow. But, whatever I’m doing I always keep my eyes open as well. My brain doesn’t turn off. I should probably start meditating. I’m totally in control all the time- like Patrick Bateman.

http://www.tomahawkstudios.com/

http://www.vanshe.com/

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 719 other followers